Kisqali ® is first breast cancer therapy specifically for premenopausal women

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Novartis has announced a new approval for Kisqali ® (ribociclib) from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for women with hormone-receptor positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HR+/HER2-) advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

Kisqali is now the only CDK4/6 inhibitor indicated for use with an aromatase inhibitor for the treatment of pre-, peri- or postmenopausal women in the US, and also is indicated for use in combination with fulvestrant as both first- or second-line therapy in postmenopausal women. The FDA reviewed this supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) under its Real-Time Oncology Review and Assessment Aid pilot programs and approved the application in less than one month after submission.

This approval is based on the pivotal MONALEESA-7 and MONALEESA-3 Phase III clinical trials that demonstrated prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) and improvements as early as eight weeks for Kisqali-based regimens compared to endocrine therapy alone.

In MONALEESA-7, Kisqali plus an aromatase inhibitor and goserelin nearly doubled the median PFS compared to an aromatase inhibitor and goserelin alone in pre- or perimenopausal women. In MONALEESA-3, Kisqali plus fulvestrant demonstrated a median PFS of 20.5 months compared to 12.8 months for fulvestrant alone across the overall population of first-line and second-line postmenopausal women.

Approximately 155,000 people in the US are living with metastatic breast cancer. Up to one-third of patients with early-stage breast cancer will subsequently develop advanced disease, for which there is currently no cure. Advanced breast cancer in premenopausal women is a biologically distinct and more aggressive disease, and it is the leading cause of cancer death in women 20-59 years old.

Liz Barrett, CEO, Novartis Oncology said, “Compelling data for Kisqali have led to the broadest first-line indications of any CDK4/6 inhibitor. With this new approval Kisqali has the potential to help even more people in the US live a longer life without progression of disease from this incurable form of breast cancer.”

Jennifer Merschdorf, CEO, Young Survival Coalition said, “Premenopausal women diagnosed with advanced breast cancer often face unique social challenges and a poorer prognosis. For the first time in nearly 20 years, we have results from a dedicated clinical trial among these women. With this approval, some younger women now have a new therapy indicated specifically for them that may help extend their lives without progression of disease.”