High blood pressure is giving the NHS high bills

Following data published by Public Health England (PHE), the organization has announced it will partner up with the local and national government to tackle the expensive burden posed on the NHS, caused by patients requiring treatment for high blood pressure.

Figures released by PHE have revealed that diseases caused by high blood pressure is costing the NHS considerable sums of money.

As a result the organization has devised a plan of action, including allying with the government, as well as the health service, voluntary sector and academia to better manage spending for patients who require treatment for illnesses associated with high blood pressure.

The action plan will be published setting out the steps towards emulating the success of other countries, such as the US and Canada, in achieving higher levels of treatment and better control of high blood pressure, leading to lower death rates from heart disease and stroke.

Increasing demand has forced the NHS to cope with diseases related to high blood pressure, which has been estimated to cost the NHS more than two billion pounds every year. Figures continue to rise, with the condition affecting more than one in four adults in the UK.

Despite the heavy burden already posed on the NHS, there are still more than five million people in the UK who are unaware they have high blood pressure.

Public Health Minister, Jane Ellison, responded to the report and the action plan, saying, “Any new initiative which will improve people’s health and wellbeing as well as saving the NHS money is to be applauded.”

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, can increase a person’s risk of a heart attack or stroke, and is often dubbed as a ‘silent killer’.